WARNING

You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience.

Close [x]

Cat & Kitten Vaccination

Dr. Winkler will tailor your cat's vaccine schedule to fit their individual lifestyles and risk of exposure.

Young kittens with immature immune systems are at the greatest risk of contracting contagious feline diseases, which is why vaccination is very important.  Older cats who have spent a lifetime indoors with lapsed vaccination may be exposed to disease through the introduction of a new feline housemate.  Any cat that goes outside, even for brief moments, increases their risk of exposure to disease through contact with other cats, or from what other cats have left behind in the environment.

Preventative Health & Wellness Vaccines

These are the vaccines your cat should have during their lifetime in order to prevent them becoming ill with any of these highly contagious feline diseases.  Vaccination for cats starts in kittens at 6-8 weeks of age, and is given as boosters at 12 weeks, 16 weeks, and 20 weeks.  After the last booster in their kitten vaccine series, the vaccinations have a protection period of approximately one year, and therefore adult cats must receive a vaccination booster once a year for life in order to maintain optimal protection against these diseases.  Some, but not all, of these diseases have the availability of Yearly Vaccine Titers to monitor a cat’s protection against them, that way if their lifestyles are considered “low risk” for possible exposure, the Suffolk Veterinary Group Animal Wellness Clinic can tailor a vaccine protocol particular to that patient.

Click Here For Our Reduced Cost Well-Pet Care Program


Rabies

Suffolk Veterinary Group Animal Wellness & Laser Surgery Center Complies With New York State Department Of Health Law Regarding Mandatory Rabies Vaccination For All Cats, Dogs, and Domesticated Ferrets.

For the protection of the public, and our Veterinary Team, we will not administer services to your pet without proof of up-to-date Rabies Vaccination.  All patients of Suffolk Veterinary Group are required to carry certification of Rabies Vaccination to remain in good standing with our clinic.

Please see the link "What Pet Owners Need To Know About Rabies" for more information.


The High Risk Lifestyle Of Outdoor Roaming Cats

An outdoor lifestyle has been shown to be beneficial to many felines, providing them with exercise and plenty of environmental stimulation that prevents them from the likelihood of getting bored and overweight.  Unfortunately, an outdoor roaming lifestyle does come with many risks to your cat’s safety and health.  Outdoor roaming felines are at a high risk of being injured by other cats, wildlife, dogs, and vehicles.  They are also at a high risk of contracting contagious diseases from contact with other cats, and parasites.  Un-neutered and un-spayed outdoor roaming cats contribute to cat over-population.  Even if only one cat in a household is outdoor roaming, they can bring back disease and parasites that infect their indoor staying housemates.  Suffolk Veterinary Group Animal Wellness Clinic recommends that if your cat is outdoor roaming, they be examined and tested for disease and parasites by a Veterinarian on a once a year basis. 


Not All Indoor Cats Are Completely At No Risk

In multiple cat households, even if only one cat goes outdoors, they put at risk of infectious disease and parasites all the other cats that live with them.  All felines which will be exposed to a new kitten in the household should have vaccines to protect them from the possibility of the new kitten carrying diseases.  A consultation with our Veterinary Team can help assist with determining the particular lifestyle risks of your cat so we can tailor their vaccine protocol.


Feline “4-in-1” Vaccine

The most common vaccination for cats, also known as the “Feline Distemper Vaccine,” or “FVRCP-Ch" for short, is actually a combined vaccination against Feline Viral Rhinotrachieitis, Calicivirus, Panleukopenia, and Chlamydia psittaci.  Vaccination for cats starts in kittens at 6-8 weeks of age, and is given as boosters at 12 weeks, 16 weeks, and 20 weeks.  After the last booster in their kitten vaccine series, the vaccinations have a protection period of approximately one year, and therefore adult cats must receive a vaccination booster once a year for life in order to maintain optimal protection against these diseases.  Some, but not all, of these diseases have the availability of Yearly Vaccine Titers to monitor a cat’s protection against them, that way if their lifestyles are considered “low risk” for possible exposure, the Suffolk Veterinary Group Animal Wellness Clinic can tailor a vaccine protocol particular to that patient.  The diseases “FVRCP-Ch” protect against are described below.

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (FVRCP-Ch)

A highly contagious viral disease that affects the respiratory system.  This disease can strike at cats of any age, but is most severe in young kittens.  The most common symptoms involve heavy mucus discharge from the eyes and nose.  Secondary bacterial infections can occur, making symptoms worst.

All cats should be vaccinated for Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis yearly if they frequent boarding catteries, grooming parlors, pet shops, or are in contact with neighborhood cats while outdoor roaming.  All cats which will be exposed to a new kitten in the household should also have vaccine boosters for FVR to protect them from the possibility of the new kitten carrying the disease.

If your cat has a lifestyle in which the possibility of them contracting FVR is low, Suffolk Veterinary Group Animal Wellness Center recommends that such cats be placed on a three-year vaccine protocol, and have Yearly Preventative Health Exams with a Veterinarian once a year to re-assess lifestyle risk, and provide early detection of other feline diseases.

Feline Calicivirus (FVRCP-Ch)

Symptoms of Feline Calicivirus include high fevers, lethargy, excessive salivation, and mouth and tongue ulcers.  This disease can make it difficult for a cat to eat and get proper nutrition.  Lowered immune response and malnutrition lead to the debilitating effects of this disease.

All cats should be vaccinated for Feline Calicivirus yearly if they frequent boarding catteries, grooming parlors, pet shops, or are in contact with neighborhood cats while outdoor roaming.  All cats which will be exposed to a new kitten in the household should also have vaccine boosters for Feline Calicivirus to protect them from the possibility of the new kitten carrying the disease.

If your cat has a lifestyle in which the possibility of them contracting Feline Calicivirus is low, Suffolk Veterinary Group Animal Wellness Center recommends that such cats be placed on a three-year vaccine protocol, and have Yearly Preventative Health Exams with a Veterinarian once a year to re-asses lifestyle risk, and provide early detection of other feline diseases.

Feline Panleukopenia (FVRCP-Ch)

Also called “Feline Distemper,” this highly contagious disease causes severe vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration.  It is the most widespread diseases of cats, and causes the highest rate of death, especially among young kittens.  Hospitalization for this disease provides hydration and nutritional support, but may not be effective for the most debilitating cases.

All cats should be vaccinated for Feline Panleukopenia yearly if they frequent boarding catteries, grooming parlors, pet shops, or are in contact with neighborhood cats while outdoor roaming.  All cats which will be exposed to a new kitten in the household should also have vaccine boosters for Feline Panleukopenia to protect them from the possibility of the new kitten carrying the disease.

If your cat has a lifestyle in which the possibility of them contracting Feline Panleukopenia is low, Suffolk Veterinary Group Animal Wellness Center recommends that such cats be placed on a three-year vaccine protocol, and have Yearly Preventative Health Exams with a Veterinarian once a year to re-asses lifestyle risk, and provide early detection of other feline diseases.

Chlamydia Psittaci (FVRCP-Ch)

We are busy researching more information about this disease and what it means for your feline friend.  Thanks for your understanding!


Lifestyle Vaccines

Two fatal feline diseases also have vaccines available to protect your cat from severe illness and prolonged hospitalizations.  After a consultation with the Suffolk Veterinary Group Animal Wellness Veterinary Team as to your cat’s particular lifestyle, it is imperative that cats which are high risk for exposure to these diseases get vaccinated against them.  Many public facilities, such as boarding catteries and grooming parlors, will not welcome your cat’s patronage without certification that they have been recently vaccinated against the following diseases.  Vaccination against these diseases is not always 100% effective, so it is important to have diagnostic screenings for these diseases for your cat yearly if they are high risk for infection, and do as much as possible to reduce their risk of exposure.

Feline Leukemia (FeLV)

A fatal form of cancer caused by a virus, it weakens a cat’s immune system by attacking the white blood cells responsible for a cat’s protection from so many other diseases.  Tumors may appear anywhere over the body, and on organs.  Kittens can become infected through their mother.  There is no cure for Feline Leukemia, and palliative care is provided if illness becomes debilitating.

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)

Commonly referred to as “Feline AIDS,” it also is a virus of a cat’s immune system, making it difficult for an infected cat to fight other diseases.  Kittens can become infected through their mother.  Many cats can live happy lives while carrying FIV provided steps are taken to prevent their exposure to other illness and infection which their immune systems cannot fend off.  There is no cure for FIV, and palliative care is provided if illness becomes debilitating.

If you have any questions regarding your cat’s particular Health & Wellness Profile, and what your cat’s lifestyle means in regards to their particular risk for exposure to the above diseases, please call 631-696-2400 to schedule a consultation with one of our Veterinary Team members.  They’ll be able to review with you your cat’s past medical history and lifestyle with you to determine what vaccine protocol provides the best protection for them.

Sign up using the form below or call (631) 696-2400 to make an appointment.

THIS ---->https://my.vetmatrixbase.com/suffolkveterinarygroup.com/medical-services/vaccination-services/cat-vaccination.html

Office Hours

DayOpenClosed
Monday10:00am7:00pm
Tuesday4:00pm7:00pm
Wednesday10:00am7:00pm
Thursday10:00am7:00pm
FridayClosedClosed
Saturday9:00am5:00pm
SundayClosedClosed
Day Open Closed
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
10:00am 4:00pm 10:00am 10:00am Closed 9:00am Closed
7:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm Closed 5:00pm Closed

Testimonial

I want to thank Dr. Winkler and his staff. They are the most compassionate animal care center ever. And when we recently had to put our kitty down, no where else will you receive the compassion they show. God bless them for their kindness and caring hearts.

Barbara B.
Selden, NY

Newsletter Sign Up